Previous month:
December 2018

January 2019

Salaries - PR Director 2019

CRM ConfusionThe following estimates are from three sources on the same day (January 13, 2019).  Actual pay varies greatly by location.  Read the job descriptions. 

More:

From January 2019 through March 15, 2019 we will be posting up to 21 salary reviews of varying job titles in sales and marketing.

You can see the most recent postings and last year's reviews here.   Salary Reviews

glassdoor

Director of Public Relations Salaries

1,144 Salaries Updated  Dec 3, 2018  Average Base Pay  $90,585/yr

 
$62K  Low    $91K  Average   $132K  High
 
How much does a Director of Public Relations make?

The national average salary for a Director of Public Relations is $90,585 in United States. Filter by location to see Director of Public Relations salaries in your area. Salary estimates are based on 1,144 salaries submitted anonymously to Glassdoor by Director of Public Relations employees

indeed

Director of Public Relations Salaries in the United States

The average salary for a Director of Public Relations is $65,014 per year in the United States. Salary estimates are based on 860 salaries submitted anonymously to Indeed by Director of Public Relations employees, users, and collected from past and present job advertisements on Indeed in the past 36 months. The typical tenure for a Director of Public Relations is 1-3 years.
Salary estimated from 860 employees, users, and past and present job advertisements on Indeed in the past 36 months. Last updated: January 11, 2019
Average salary   $65,014 per year     $14,000-$169,000

BONUS  $5,087

PROFIT SHARING   $9,792

The average pay for a Public Relations (PR) Director is $83,234 per year.
$47k    -  10%      $83k  50%     $135k   90%    MEDIAN $83,234
 
 
Salary $46,704 - $134,747
 
Bonus $991 - $24,978
 
Profit Sharing $966 - $15,319
 
Commission $9,792
 
Total Pay (?) $44,030 - $141,005
 

 


What You Sell Today Started with Marketing Six Months Ago

This is Part 2 of last week’s post:  January: the Most Important Month of the Year

When sales are flagging and excuses are flying from salespeople failing to make quota, few people understand that the reason IStock-533903997for most quota failures is what Marketing didn’t do three to six months ago.  Today’s sold deal started from Marketing’s ability to find a qualified prospect three to six months ago.  This isn’t my fact, it’s the fact.

Most B2B companies have a 3-to-6-month sales cycle, some are 12 to 18 months.  If Marketing isn’t spending forward with an eye to the future when the forecast comes due, it isn’t doing its job.  That’s why when Sales isn’t making quota in a quarter, most of the leads Marketing creates will have little impact on the failing quarter (but will have an impact on the following quarters). 

Why it Matters

"Today’s sold deal started from Marketing’s ability to find a qualified prospect three to six months ago.  This isn’t my fact, it’s the fact."

That’s why rapid emergency lead generation efforts made in a given month, trying to save the month, fail (although it offers a good excuse for Marketing when they say, “Well, we did everything we could.”).     Marketing’s belated efforts may make up for some of the forecasted failure, but it’s often too little too late for the applicable month or quarter.  The saving grace is that it may bump up sales in the following quarters.

Have I said what you think I said?  Yep!

Yes, Marketing must work six months ahead for Sales to do its job.  The failure of most marketing departments is that they’re counting the wrong thing.  Counting lead generation for this month isn’t a consolation for salespeople’s failing in this month, because Sales didn’t have enough leads to start working on 3-6 months ago.

Why it Matters:

“Marketing must work six months ahead for Sales to do its job.  The failure of most marketing departments is that they’re counting the wrong thing.  Counting lead generation for this month isn’t a consolation for salespeople’s failing in this month, because Sales didn’t have enough leads to start working on 3-6 months ago.”

What this means is Marketing must work ahead, and its lead generation budget is sacrosanct, sacred, and untouchable if management wants salespeople to make quota.  If Marketing isn’t doing its job to provide qualified leads, Marketing’s heads are on the block as much as those of salespeople who don’t make quota.  It’s true that:

  1. Marketing must forecast the number of qualified leads salespeople need to make quota.
  2. The marketing-qualified leads must arrive three to six months prior to the expected lead closure period.
  3. In addition, the qualified lead count must increase ahead of the forecasted increase in sales for the year. Both departments are on an upward trajectory; Marketing is just ahead of Sales by 3-6 months.
  4. If the marketing budget is cut, and a sales lead brownout occurs, expect a sales downturn within 3 to 6 months.
  5. Lead generation in the last two quarters of a year support the coming year for a good Q1 as well as the final Q4 of the current year. Hint to CFO and President: cutting the marketing budget in the final months of a year cuts your own throat for Q1 of the new year. 

The majority of sales lead closure is consistently driven by the products sales cycle.   You can speed up lead generation somewhat to find buyers who are late in their buying cycle, but it usually isn’t enough to save a quarter, much less the year. 

Like it or not these are the facts, not my facts or opinion. 


Salaries - Sales Enablement Managers

6a0147e05adc32970b01bb08d75c74970d-320wiThe following estimates are from two sources on the same day (January 13, 2019).  Actual pay varies greatly by location.  Read the job descriptions. 

More:

From January 2019 through March 15, 2019 we will be posting  salary reviews of varying job titles in sales and marketing.

You can see the most recent postings and last year's reviews here.   Salary Reviews

glassdoor

Sales Enablement Manager Salaries

How much does a Sales Enablement Manager make?

The national average salary for a Sales Enablement Manager is $77,460 in United States. Filter by location to see Sales Enablement Manager salaries in your area. Salary estimates are based on 37,531 salaries submitted anonymously to Glassdoor by Sales Enablement Manager employee

37,531  Salaries Updated  Jan 3, 2019    Average Base Pay  $77,460/yr
 
$48K  Low   $127K  High      Additional Cash Compensation
Average$23,138
Range$3,704 - $94,299
 

ZipRecruiter

Average Salary of Sales Enablement Manager Jobs

National Average  $105,937/year 
$78,000 -  $138,500
 
As of Jan 11, 2019, the average annual pay for a Sales Enablement Manager in the United States is $105,937 a year.

While ZipRecruiter is seeing annual salaries as high as $138,500 and as low as $78,000, the majority of Sales Enablement Manager salaries currently range between $94,500 (25th percentile) to $116,000 (75th percentile) across the United States. The average pay range for a Sales Enablement Manager varies little (about $21,500), which suggests that regardless of location, there are not many opportunities for increased pay or advancement, even with several years of experience.

To estimate the most accurate annual salary range for Sales Enablement Manager jobs, ZipRecruiter continuously scans its database of millions of active jobs published locally throughout America.

Find your next high paying job as a Sales Enablement Manager on ZipRecruiter today.

______________________________________________

Sales Enablement still appears to be a fairly recent title as most of the big job sites confuse the title with other sales management jobs. 

 


When Presidents Set Unrealistic Quotas

IStock-527444717Truth be known, most quotas are set by the company president, CFO or sales manager sitting in a room, deciding on what revenue growth they want and backing into the numbers. 

It seldom has anything to do with what's possible, how marketing can help, a sales or marketing plan or whether they should hire new sales reps to bring in the increased volume.   It's pure wishful thinking based on nothing more than they want it to happen. 

The consequences are devastating.

The first sign of unrealistic quotas occurs when top salespeople who made past quotas struggle.  Within a few months, these reps’ quota performance starts to dip below 70%, and heads south.  When questioned, the salespeople say the quotas are too high, among other things, but management dismisses this as typical sales grunt grumbling. 

A few more months pass and the numbers aren’t looking good.  The forecast is in the toilet, products are not being sold, and inventory is building.   Still management has its head where the sun doesn’t shine, and nobody has the guts to admit that a few months ago, at the beginning of the year when new quotas came out, requirements were too high. 

“It will be easy to sell the new product,” said the head of engineering.   “We’ve priced it just right,” said Marketing.  The sales manager said, “It fits in with other products and should be an easy sell.”  But no one asked the salespeople.

The salespeople are used to being dumped on, so when new quotas came out they begrudgingly accepted them (not that they had a choice). 

When asked, the top salesperson said, “We can sell it, but the volume they want isn’t realistic.  Don’t they do any research to know how many buyers I probably have in my territory?  My attitude is screw it, I can only do what I can do; threats and loud voices at sales meeting don’t motivate me.”

A Salesperson's Response

"My attitude is screw it, I can only do what I can do; threats and loud voices at sales meeting don’t motivate me.”

Other salespeople typically say, “They add to my quota, but never take anything away.  Don’t they know I have only so many hours in a day? It’s like asking a guy in manufacturing to go from punching out 500 products a day on a machine to 650.  It isn’t going to happen unless something else changes.”

And so it goes.  When salespeople see the top dog struggling and management is increasing the pressure without support (sales leads), a great new opportunity turns into a demotivation engine.  Ever try to whip a donkey into moving? 

Unrealistic Quotas Have Consequences

  1. When few make quota, few make bonus. Not a good thing.  Hugely demotivating.   Try having YOUR salary reduced for six months because you couldn’t work fast enough.
  2. Sales territory turnover goes up. No one likes to be a loser or play on a losing team.  If they aren’t fired for not making quota, they leave anyway.
  3. Sales expenses jump. Travel increases, discounting is common, and open territories lie fallow.
  4. The coach gets fired. Sales management tenure is said to be less than two years. Unrealistic quotas for salespeople mean unrealistic quotas for sales management. 
  5. Margins slide. When sales falter, margins falter as Marketing makes offers that cut into the profit margin.  The CFO isn’t pleased. The company president is less pleased than the CFO, and the board of directors suggests maybe the salespeople need training. They are all wrong; it isn’t training.  Training is a fool’s illusion.

Have the Courage to Recalibrate

Go to the salespeople and ask what they can realistically sell. Ask them what support they need.  Adjust their quotas and generate qualified leads to help them close the business.  Don’t resort to discounting; that’s for wimps who don’t know how to sell.

__________________________________________

This is one of the 56 reasons companies fail to reach quota in the article: How to Turn Around Failing Sales.


Salary - CRM Manager 2019

6a0147e05adc32970b01bb099c7370970dThe following estimates are from three sources on the same day (January 4, 2019).  Actual pay varies greatly by location.  Read the job descriptions. 

More:

From January 2019 through March 15, 2019 we will be posting up to 21 salary reviews of varying job titles in sales and marketing.

You can see the most recent postings and last year's reviews here.   Salary Reviews

glassdoor

CRM Marketing Manager Salaries   $93,125 

About This Data  39,804 Salaries Updated Dec 3, 2018

Average Base Pay

$93,125/yr    $65K  Low     $93K Average   $130K  High

Additional Cash Compensation   Average $10,128  

Range $2,634 - $27,770

The national average salary for a CRM Marketing Manager is $93,125 in United States. Filter by location to see CRM Marketing Manager salaries in your area. Salary estimates are based on 39,804 salaries submitted anonymously to Glassdoor by CRM Marketing Manager employees.

PayScale

Average Sales CRM Manager  $67,341

$6,707  BONUS    $3,842  PROFIT SHARING     $10,000  COMMISSION

Job Description for Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Manager

Customer relationship management (CRM) managers work in many types of industries to ensure organizations' success in profitability, reputation, and customer satisfaction. These professionals manage the relationship between the business and the consumer. A CRM manager is concerned with customer experience: How can the business improve the customer’s satisfaction and the likelihood that they return for future business? CRM managers also often work closely with the marketing department, providing employees with tools and technology to better serve customer needs.

The work CRM managers do is mainly mental, with a lot of critical thinking and the use of abstract ideas involved. Frequently a CRM manager must think “outside the box” to maintain successful consumer relationships and pursue offers, experiences, and products that competitors are not providing. Generally speaking, CRM managers work mostly in an office setting, and they might spend their workdays researching marketing techniques, training employees, or meeting directly with customers and/or clientele.

Typically, a CRM manager must have a bachelor's degree in a business-related field, such as marketing. Further, a customer relationship management certificate may be preferred by employers. (Copyright 2019 PayScale.com)

Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Manager Tasks

  • Develop and execute marketing campaign strategy and analyze campaign performance.
  • Communicate with internal and external partners to meet customer expectations.
  • Negotiate contract renewal, draft reports, and provide progress analysis.
  • Monitor and provide support on the implementation of service agreements.

Salary.com

Salary for  CRM Targeted Marketing Campaign Manager in the United States   $94,643

How much does a CRM Targeted Marketing Campaign Manager earn in the United States? The average CRM Targeted Marketing Campaign Manager salary in the United States is $94,643 as of December 28, 2018, but the range typically falls between $83,990 and $115,580. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession. With more online, real-time compensation data than any other website, Salary.com helps you determine your exact pay target. 

Job Description

Determines the most effective points of interaction (POI) for marketing campaigns by using reports from the customer information center system. Applies customer and sales information from the Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system to achieve marketing goals. Requires a bachelor's degree in area of specialty. Typically reports to a manager or head of a unit/department. Typically manages through subordinate managers and professionals in larger groups of moderate complexity. Provides input to strategic decisions that affect the functional area of responsibility. May give input into developing the budget. Capable of resolving escalated issues arising from operations and requiring coordination with other departments. Typically requires 3+ years of managerial experience.


Funnel Radio Line-up January 10

Tweet-todays-funnelradio-lineup-20190110

Listen live starting at 9am Pacific: Andy Rudin of Contrary Domino on with Darryl Praill. The Ethics of Sales: Is Lying the New Normal? Rick Holmes of Every Market Media joins Mark Godley on the Data Dump Show. Does your Content Marketing Connect Emotionally? That' what Chris Reid wants to know when he's visiting with Paul Petersen on CRM Radio. Matt's guest is Tiffany Bova. They are discussing What’s Your Growth IQ? What it Means and Why it’s Important to Your Success. At noon, Kyla O'Connell and John Edwards remind us to be found, you have to be FINDABLE. Our day ends with our own, Susan Finch and her guest, Whitney Marshall co-founder of Qualified Meetings. Whitney takes us through When to outsource sales training to jump start growth. Join us live or catch replays of any of your favorite shows. https://goo.gl/8qj6uR - it's a great link to bookmark.

880x440-tweet-iis-rudin9:00 INSIDE Inside Sales with host, Darryl Praill, @VanillaSoft @ohpinon8ed

Guest: Andy Rudin @andy_rudin @contrarydomino

The Ethics of Sales: Is Lying the New Normal?

https://goo.gl/w1j4DZ


20190110-dd-tweet-holmes10:30 Data Dump Show by LeadGenius, hosted by Mark Godley @LeadGenius

Guest: Rick Holmes

A View from a Data Builder - the State of B2B from a Wholesaler

https://goo.gl/b9rZYN


Tweet-crm-20180823-reid11:00 CRM Radio by GoldMine CRM with host, Paul Petersen @GoldMineCRM

Guest: Chris Reid @constantcontent

Does your Content Marketing Connect Emotionally?

https://goo.gl/kS2DPF


Tweets-instream-images-800x600-Bova11:30 Sales Pipeline Radio with host, Matt Heinz @HeinzMarketing

Guest: Tiffany Bova @Tiffani_Bova

What’s Your Growth IQ? What it Means and Why it’s Important to Your Success

Listen live here > or catch up on replays while you wait for the live show.


20190110-asher-kyla-edwards12:00 Asher Sales Sense by Asher Sales Strategies with host, Kyla O'Connell@ASHERSTRATEGIES

John Edwards, Exec VP, Communica

To be Found You have to be Findable

https://goo.gl/j1C4ks


Tweet-rooted-whiteny-marshall-qualified-meetings12:30 Rooted in Revenue with host, Susan Finch @susanfinchweb

Guest: Whitney Marshall, Co-Founder, Qualified Meetings @QualMeetings

When to outsource sales training to jump start growth.

https://goo.gl/uCWWgj

 


January: the Most Important Month of the Year

IStock-188078193If you start the year slow and sloppy, you’ll be chasing your forecast all year. 

Failure to make the first month of a new year (whether that’s January or your fiscal year starting month) means the first quarter is at high risk.  Fail to make Q1 and Q2 is at a greater risk.  Fail to make the half and you may as well start looking for a job because you’re on track to lose the year. 

Making the January forecast gives you a better-than-even chance for making the Q1 forecast because momentum is in your favor. No, January isn’t the time to rest, have a national sales meeting, or take a long-deserved vacation. It’s the time to make your numbers and have some chance of making the year.  

With momentum from a successful Q1 in your favor, Q2 becomes easier and doubly as important before the summer slump takes hold.   

Why it Matters

“January isn’t the time to rest, have a national sales meeting, or take a long-deserved vacation. It’s the time to make your numbers and have some chance of making the year. “

And then there is Q3:  The Summer Doldrums

While Marketing should have been helping build your momentum by increasing demand, the summer months are when Marketing can really shine.  Yes, 25-40% of the country has disappeared and isn’t taking calls, but this is when Marketing should spend more on lead generation to dig out qualified leads Sales needs to make Q3.  If Marketing takes the summer off, by not making a larger effort to offset the slow season, the marketing manager should also be looking for a job because he or she obviously doesn’t understand their responsibilities. 

The increase in qualified leads for Q3 must start in Q2 and through the summer to setup Q4.   Find enough MQLs  and salespeople will make Q3.   And Q3 is the turning point for most companies.  If you make forecast by the end of Q3, the year is baked and delivered.   It would take an act of God for you to fail.

If Q3 is slow because of the summer season (or Marketing’s failure), the setup for Q4 sales can be deadly.  It’s all about momentum, momentum, and momentum.  It’s almost impossible to make up for a sloppy Q1 and a slowdown in Q3 and still have a successful year.  Q4 is often the largest quarter of the year but is often driven by desperation; in most instances it isn’t enough to save the forecast. 

At this point you’re thinking to yourself (yes, it’s all about you): Gee, January is either looking good for me or not so good,(maybe we shouldn’t have pulled everyone out of the field for that one-week sales meeting.  

Take your lumps if January is poor and redouble your efforts in February and March.  Ask Marketing to build the pipeline because you might recover if you don’t believe everything your salespeople tell you about delayed decisions, unqualified leads, snowstorms, and competitors. At this point Marketing’s also behind the curve, but it can create enough qualified leads if it has enough money.  Marketing is more agile in creating immediate demand if allowed to spend the money.

If you are on track in January, manage the pipeline, hug it, and love it to be sure that the momentum continues to build.    A couple more thoughts:

  1. Your CRM system is your next-to-best friend. It doesn’t lie.  Salespeople tell you what you want to hear; the CRM reports reality whether you like it or not. It tells you what happened in the past and forecasts the future; unless someone is lying to you about his or her territory.  Lying is a firing offense.
  2. Your marketing people are your best friends because they can deliver you from failure with qualified leads. Demand it from them, make sure they’re funded, and they can do it.

You still have two weeks to make the January forecast.  Get back to work.

More

Part 2 will be published on January 15:  What You Sell Today Started with Marketing Six Months Ago.

You may also like:

Save the Quarter (and maybe the year) with this Proven Tactic

How to Crush Q1 – Guaranteed


Salaries - National Sales Manager 2019

6a0147e05adc32970b01bb099c7370970dThe following estimates are from three sources on the same day (January 4, 2019).  Actual pay varies greatly by location. 

More:

From January 2019 through March 15, 2019 we will be posting up to 21 salary reviews of varying job titles in sales and marketing.

You can see the most recent postings and last year's reviews here.   Salary Reviews

Payscale

Average National Sales Manager Salary  $82,057

$14,588  BONUS  $4,913  PROFIT SHARING  $19,623  COMMISSION

MEDIAN $82,057

Salary          $48,731 - $130,165        

Bonus          $2,540 - $38,795  

Profit Sharing         $291 - $20,303     

Commission $2.70 - $51,176    

Total Pay (?) $53,145 - $153,322

Glassdoor

National Sales Manager Salaries in United States $93,481/yr

About This Data   834 Salaries   Updated Dec 29, 2018

$51K  Low  $93K  Average  $145K High

The national average salary for a National Sales Manager is $93,481 in United States. Filter by location to see National Sales Manager salaries in your area. Salary estimates are based on 834 salaries submitted anonymously to Glassdoor by National Sales Manager employees.

ZipRecruiter

Average Salary of National Sales Manager Jobs  $88,117

From $24,000 to $150,500 annually

As of Jan 3, 2019, the average annual pay for a National Sales Manager in the United States is $88,117 a year.

While ZipRecruiter is seeing annual salaries as high as $150,500 and as low as $24,000, the majority of National Sales Manager salaries currently range between $63,500 (25th percentile) to $106,000 (75th percentile) across the United States. The average pay range for a National Sales Manager varies little (about $42,500), which suggests that regardless of location, there are not many opportunities for increased pay or advancement, even with several years of experience.

Based on recent job postings on ZipRecruiter, the National Sales Manager job market in both Bellingham, WA and the surrounding area is very active. People working as a National Sales Manager in your area are making on average $85,648 per year or $2,469 (3%) less than the national average annual salary of $88,117. Washington ranks number 14 out of 50 states nationwide for National Sales Manager salaries.

To estimate the most accurate annual salary range for National Sales Manager jobs, ZipRecruiter continuously scans its database of millions of active jobs published locally throughout America.

Find your next high paying job as a National Sales Manager on ZipRecruiter today.


Is Lying the New Normal? The Ethics of Sales from Andy Rudin and Darryl Praill

Where do you draw the line? How do you stay true to your moral compass in the current sales culture climate? In this episode, Andy Rudin will help you find proactive plans that won’t corrode your reputation. He will help you to navigate away from discussions that may lead to fatal mistakes and towards a strategy to find an acceptable middle ground.

With the hot-button issue of ethics and integrity becoming increasingly prevalent, Rudin discusses maintaining your values through the sales process. He also will tell you how to avoid serious consequences when ethical dilemmas challenge your personal convictions.

20190110-640x640-iis-rudinAbout our guest, Andy Rudin.

Andrew (Andy) Rudin is one of the foremost authorities on ethics in sales. He works to aid B2B companies identify, assess, and manage a broad spectrum of revenue risks. Andrew (Andy) Rudin is Managing Principal of Contrary Domino, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in sales strategy development and execution.

Andy provides solutions to companies that strengthen sales governance, revenue risk management, and ethical compliance (GRC). His cross-industry background in marketing, sales, and product management uniquely positions him to help companies in many industries manage a wide range of revenue growth challenges. Andy has a BS in marketing and an MS in information technology, both from the University of Virginia.

About Contrary Domino

Manage your revenue risks, achieve your goals.

Contrary Domino, Inc. began in 2001 as Outside Technologies, Inc., a sales strategy consulting company. In 2014, the company name changed to Contrary Domino because it reflected the challenges faced by our customers—namely, how to create and foster change.

Since the company’s founding, we have guided companies on strategic and tactical business development programs, all of which have required the ability to manage the many uncertainties around revenue attainment. It’s a common business problem, and one that we’ve dedicated all of our time, energy, and experience toward solving.

Connect with our guest:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/contrarydomino/
http://www.twitter.com/andy_rudin
http://www.twitter.com/contrarydomino
http://www.contrarydomino.com


Salaries Event Managers - 2019

6a0147e05adc32970b01bb08d75c74970d-320wiThe following estimates are from three sources on the same day (January 4, 2019).  Actual pay varies greatly by location.  

More:

From January 2019 through March 15, 2019 we will be posting up to 21 salary reviews of varying job titles in sales and marketing.

You can see the most recent postings and last year's reviews here.   Salary Reviews

glassdoor

Event Manager Salaries  About This Data 3,360 Salaries  Updated  Jan 3, 2019

Average Base Pay  $61,923/yr

$43K   Low   $62K Average $88K High

Additional Cash Compensation

Average $6,002

How much does an Event Manager make?

The national average salary for a Event Manager is $61,923 in United States. Filter by location to see Event Manager salaries in your area. Salary estimates are based on 3,360 salaries submitted anonymously to Glassdoor by Event Manager employees. Less

salary.com

Salary for Meeting/Event Manager in the United States  $78,589

This is the average base pay.  The total compensation average is $81,562

The average Meeting/Event Manager salary in the United States is $78,589 as of December 28, 2018, but the range typically falls between $69,018 and $89,185. Salary ranges can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, the number of years you have spent in your profession. With more online, real-time compensation data than any other website, Salary.com helps you determine your exact pay target. 

indeed

Event Manager Salaries in the United States $49,248 per year

Salary estimated from 1,500 employees, users, and past and present job advertisements on Indeed in the past 36 months. Last updated: January 1, 2019

How much does an Event Manager make in the United States?

The average salary for an Event Manager is $49,248 per year in the United States. Salary estimates are based on 1,500 salaries submitted anonymously to Indeed by Event Manager employees, users, and collected from past and present job advertisements on Indeed in the past 36 months. The typical tenure for an Event Manager is 1-3 years.  The yearly distribution ranges between $14,000 and $109,000.